Working With Dr. Renshaw

*Please note: I may be taking a new student in Fall 2019.

Being a Graduate Student in my Lab

In general, the best match for my lab and our program is a student who is quite interested in research. I very much value clinical work (I provide supervision for graduate students in their early clinical work, with a strong focus on CBT for anxiety and couples problems), and I think anyone with a degree in clinical psychology should be fully competent in clinical work. At the same time, as a graduate mentor, I am best matched with a student who is seeking a career that will include research work as a primary focus. This is also the case for our program in general, which operates on a “clinical science” model.

I expect my students to devote a great deal of effort to research in their training. This goes beyond simply completing the program requirements (2nd-year project and dissertation), and typically includes conference posters and presentations, journal articles, and grant applications. I also strongly encourage my students to prepare training grant applications in their first 2 years (with guidance, of course!) – nearly all of my graduate students have submitted or are planning to submit applications for some form of external funding. In turn, I devote a great deal of effort to research mentorship. My style is fairly hands-on, with increasing independence of students as they progress through the program. I typically meet weekly with students during their first year and biweekly with students after that, but this is tailored to the specific needs of each student at various times in the program.

 

Student Grants 

I encourage my students to seek all levels of funding, including grants for research projects, fellowships and stipend awards to support students' training (e.g., Ford Foundation, NSF), and NIH-funded training grant awards. Major extramural funding that has been obtained by my graduate students over the last several years is listed here (*denotes student from my prior position at University of Utah):

 

Fellowship/Training Grant Awards

Date Student Sponsor Type of Award Award Provisions
2013 Hilary Weingarden NIMH F31 (Nat'l Research Service Award) Stipend, Tuition, Small Budget (2 yrs)
2013 Sarah Campbell NIMH F31 (Nat'l Research Service Award) Stipend, Tuition, Small Budget (2.5 yrs)
2011 Catherine Caska* NIMH F31 (Nat'l Research Service Award) Stipend, Tuition, Small Budget (3 yrs)
2010 Rebecca Blais* Univ of Utah Eccles Graduate Fellowship Stipend, Tuition (1 year)
2008 Camila Rodrigues* Ford Foundation Ford Foundation Fellowship Stipend, Tuition (3 years)

 

Other Grants and Awards

Date Student Sponsor Type of Award Award Provisions
2016 Lauren Paige Ford Foundation Fellowship Honorable Mention  
2016 Sarah Campbell APA Division 56 Award for Outstanding Dissertation in Trauma Psychology  
2016 Sarah Carter Mil Suic Res Cons Dissertation Completion Award $2000 toward research costs
2015 Sarah Carter APA Division 19 Society for Military Psychology Research Grant $1500 toward research costs
2013 Sarah Campbell ISTSS Frank W. Putnam Trauma Research Scholar Award $1000 toward research costs
2013 Sarah Campbell APF Randy Gerson Memorial Grant $6000 toward research costs
2010 Catherine Caska* ISTSS Student Research Grant Award $1000 toward research costs
2010 Rebecca Blais* APA Division 19 Society for Military Psychology Research Grant $1500 toward research costs
2008 Camila Rodrigues* APA Division 19 Society for Military Psychology Research Grant $1500 toward research costs

 

Student Publications and Presentations

I regularly involve my students in research projects, and encourage them to seek additional opportunities to disseminate research findings from secondary data analysis or new data collections. Below is a list of journal articles and chapters that my doctoral students have first- or co-authored under my supervision over the past few years (*denotes doctoral student under my supervision). They are also involved in about 5-10 conference presentations per year, depending on the year (average ~ 7).

 

Publications

In Press (as of October 2018)

In Press (as of October 2018)

*Bergmann, J. S., Renshaw, K. D., & *Paige, L. (in press). Psychological well-being in Iraq and Afghanistan student veterans: Risk and protective factors. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy.

*Campbell, S. B., & Renshaw, K. D. (in press). Daily PTSD symptom accommodation and relationship functioning in military couples. Family Process.

*DiMauro, J., & Renshaw, K. D. (in press). Trauma-related disclosure in sexual assault survivors’ intimate relationships: Associations with PTSD, shame, and partners’ responses. Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

*DiMauro, J., & Renshaw, K. D. (in press). PTSD and relationship satisfaction in female survivors of sexual assault: The roles of sexuality, communication, and hostility. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, & Policy.

*Giff, S. T., Renshaw, K. D., & Allen, E. S. (in press). Post-deployment parenting of service members and partners: Associations between PTSD symptoms and parenting indices. Journal of Family Psychology.

*Paige, L., Renshaw, K. D., Allen, E. S., & Litz, B. (in press). Types of deployment trauma and treatment-seeking for PTSD. Military Psychology.

2018

*Campbell, S. B.†, & Renshaw, K. D.† (2018). Posttraumatic stress disorder and relationship functioning: A comprehensive review and organizational framework. Clinical Psychology Review, 65, 152-162.

       †Authors contributed equally to this manuscript, and are regarded as co-first authors.

*Carter, S. P., Osborne, L. J., Renshaw, K. D., Allen, E. S., Loew, B. A., Markman, H. J., & Stanley, S. M. (2018). Something to talk about: Topics of conversation between romantic partners during military deployments. Journal of Family Psychology, 32, 22-30.

*DiMauro, J., Renshaw, K. D., & Blais, R. K. (2018). Sexual vs. non-sexual trauma, sexual satisfaction and function, and mental health in female veterans. Journal of Trauma and Dissociation, 19, 403-416.

2017

*Campbell, S. B., Renshaw, K. D., Kashdan, T. B., Curby, T. W., & Carter, S. P. (2017). A daily diary study of posttraumatic stress disorder and romantic partner accommodation. Behavior Therapy, 48, 222-234.

*Campbell, S. B., Renshaw, K. D., & *Klein, S. R. (2017). Sex differences in associations of hostile and non-hostile criticism with relationship quality. Journal of Psychology: Interdisciplinary and Applied, 151, 416-430.

Renshaw, K. D., & *Campbell, S. B. (2017). Deployment-related benefit finding and postdeployment marital satisfaction in military couples. Family Process, 56, 915-925.

Renshaw, K. D., Chambless, D. L., & *Thorgusen, S. (2017). Expressed emotion and attributions in relatives of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and panic disorder. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 205, 294-299.

*Weingarden, H., Renshaw, K. D., Davidson, E., & Wilhelm, S. (2017). Relative relationships of general shame and body shame with body dysmorphic phenomenology and psychosocial outcomes. Journal of Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders, 14, 1-6.

2016

*Campbell, S. B., & Renshaw, K. D. (2016). Military couples and posttraumatic stress: Interpersonally based behaviors and cognitions as mechanisms of individual and couple distress. In S. MacDermid Wadsworth & D. Riggs (Eds.), War and family life (pp. 55-75). New York: Springer.

*Carter, S. P., *DiMauro, J. C., Renshaw, K. D., Curby, T. W., Babson, K., & Bonn-Miller, M. (2016). Longitudinal associations of friend-based social support and PTSD symptomatology during a cannabis cessation attempt. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 38, 62-67.

*Carter, S. P., & Renshaw, K. D. (2016). Communication via different media during military deployments and postdeployment relationship satisfaction. Military Behavioral Health, 4, 260-268.

*Carter, S. P., & Renshaw, K. D. (2016). Spousal communication during military deployments: A review. Journal of Family Issues, 37, 2309-2332.

*DiMauro, J. C., Renshaw, K. D., & Kashdan, T. B. (2016). Beliefs in negative mood regulation and daily negative affect in PTSD. Personality and Individual Differences, 95, 34-36.

*DiMauro, J. C., Renshaw, K. D., Smith, B., & Vogt, D. (2016). Perceived support from multiple sources: Associations with PTSD symptoms. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 29, 332-339.

*Klein, S. R., Renshaw, K. D., & Curby, T. W. (2016). Emotion regulation and perceptions of hostile and constructive criticism in romantic relationships. Behavior Therapy, 47, 143-154.

*Weingarden, H. M., & Renshaw, K. D. (2016). Body dysmorphic symptoms, functional impairment, and depression: The role of appearance-based teasing. Journal of Psychology, 150, 119-131.

*Weingarden, H. M., Renshaw, K. D., Wilhelm, S., & Tangney, J. (2016). Development and validation of the Body-Focused Guilt and Shame Scale. Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, 8, 9-20.

*Weingarden, H. M., Renshaw, K. D., Wilhelm, S., Tangney, J., & *DiMauro, J. (2016). Anxiety and shame as risk factors for depression, suicidality, and functional impairment in body dysmorphic disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 204, 832-839.